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Aitchison, J. and Gilchrist, A. Thesaurus Construction: A Practical Manual. London: ASLIB, 1987.

    A general guide to the intellectual task of developing a thesaurus.

Anderson, Eric S. "A warm fuzzy muffin: or wired rural libraries. Ohio Libraries 8 (Spring/Summer 1995): 6-8.

    Thoughts on planning, libraries, and the future.

Boss, Richard. The Library Manager's Guide to Automation. 2nd edition. White Plains, NY: Knowledge Industry Publications, Inc., 1984.

    Introduction to computer technology for managers. Includes discussion of planning considerations for acquiring and implementing an automated system.

Butler, Brett, and Aveney, Brian, and Scholz, William. "Conversion of Manual Catalogs to Collection Databases." Library Technology Reports 14 (March/April 1978) 109-201.

    Comprehensive coverage of procedures for doing bibliographic data conversion.

Carter, Ruth C. and Bruntjen, Scott. Data Conversion. White Plains, NY: Knowledge Industry Press, 1983.

    Planning and implementation of a data conversion project. Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of various methods of conversion.

Clayton, Marlene. Managing Library Automation. London: Gower Publishing Company, 1987.

    Concise, readable guide to the main factors which librarians should be aware of when considering computerization. General principles behind library automation, terminology and standard techniques used in the field are emphasized. Includes advice on introducing systems from the earliest planning stages, through the entire procurement exercise, implementation and the final monitoring of the working system.

Corbin, John. Implementing the Automated Library System. Phoenix: Oryx Press, 1988.

    "A practical handbook and guide for integrating automation into existing library functions." Describes the steps of the implementation project, including organizational and management structure, tasks and procedures, job design and staffing, space planning and design, documentation, database conversion, computer operations, and automated function, activation and evaluation.

Managing the Library Automation Project. Phoenix: Oryx Press, 1985.

    "A practical handbook and guide for the librarian untrained in systems development." Emphasizes the planning, organization management and step-by-step process of a library automation project. Introduces computer technology; discusses project organization, staffing, management and planning; analyzes system procurement, installation and operation; includes site preparation, database conversion, staff and user education and training, and system installation acceptance and operation.

Crawford, Walt. Bibliographic Displays in the Online Catalog. White Plains, NY: Knowledge Industry Press, 1986.

Patron Access: Issues for Online Catalogs. Boston: G.K. Hall & Co., 1987.

    Presents an exhaustive survey of dozens of aspects of online catalogs, including patron use; terminals, printers, and other peripherals; command methodology; displays; authority and heading files; indexes; processes (such as placing holds) and protection.

Dennis, Deborah Ellis. "Who's in charge of automation? The new systems librarian position." New Jersey Libraries 27 (Spring 1994): 6-7.

    Description of the skills needed and typical tasks performed by the library's staff automation specialist.

Epstein, Susan Baerg. "Implementation of an Automated System," Library Journal 108 (September 15, 1983): 1771-72.

"Retrospective Conversion Revisited," Library Journal (in 3 parts) (May 1, 1990; June 1, 1990; July 1, 1990):

"System Implementation Questions," Library Journal (February 1, 1990) 60-62

    Epstein is a consultant specializing in library automation and management. Having observed that much of the literature deals with the selection and procurement of systems, Epstein primarily emphasizes the implementation and evaluation phases of the automation project. She encourages comprehensive planning, realistic schedules and describes typical stages in the implementation process. Epstein's "Libraries & Systems" is a regular feature in LJ and offers practical suggestions for automation librarians.

Genaway, David C. Integrated Online Library Systems: Principles, Planning and Implementation. White Plains, NY: Knowledge Industry Publications, Inc., 1984.

    General discussion of many aspects of library automation, based on Genaway's own experiences selecting and implementing an integrated system at Youngstown State University.

Head, John W. and McCabe, Gerard B., editors. Insider's Guide to Library Automation: Essays of Practical Experience. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1993.

    Essays from librarians in a variety of settings, corporate, academic and public. Provides resources for "librarians involved in automation and for library science students trying to learn about what really goes on in automation...by and for practitioners -- and future practitioners." Emphasizes careful planning, communication, and staff involvement.

Hoffman, Ellen. "Managing Automation: A Process, Not a Project," Library Hi Tech. 6:1 (1988) 45-54.

    When library systems are managed as a continuing process rather than as discrete projects, they are managed by the same people who guide other library activities and not by specialists. The ongoing management of automation should reflect the style and philosophy of the library. The management issues associated with hardware, software, databases, staff and the institutional environment are discussed.

Lancaster, F. W. Vocabulary Control for Information Retrieval. 2nd ed. Arlington, VA: Information Resources Press, 1986.

    Examines the basic elements of using controlled vocabulary in online retrieval systems. Good introduction to thesaurus concepts.

Matthews, Joseph R. Public Access to Online Catalogs: A Planning Guide for Managers. Weston, CT: Online, Inc., 1982.

    A basic primer on public access online catalogs. Part One deals with design choices, searching, effects on users, planning and implementation and the future of Online Public Access Catalogs. Part Two outlines 34 operational online catalogs.

"Processing OCLC Tapes," Library Systems Newsletter. vol. VIII, no. 6 (June 1988) 41-45.

Pastine, Maureen D. and Kacena, Carolyn. "Library automation, networking, and other online and new technology costs in academic libraries." Library Trends 42 (Winter 1994): 524-536.

    "Using the costs for the library automation activities at Southern Methodist University plus a review of the literature in automation costs and requirements the authors present some of the hidden as well as obvious budgetary requirements to meet the electronic library needs in small-and medium-sized university libraries today."

Reynolds, Dennis. Library Automation: Issues and Applications. New York: R.R. Bowker Co., 1985.

    Introductory text which discusses the various aspects of library automation. In-depth review of the progress of various library applications. Includes sections outlining the phases in an automation project. Good coverage on contracts and training.

Rice, James. Introduction to Library Automation. Littleton, CO: Libraries Unlimited, 1984.

    Introductory text which provides a very readable overview of automation topics: computer technology, library applications development, systems analysis, evaluation, contracting and implementation. Includes a sample implementation schedule.

Saffady, William. Introduction to automation for librarians. Chicago: American Library Association, 3rd edition, 1994.

    Revised edition of excellent overview of automation topics.

Warwick, Robert T. "Moving to a new automated system: some issues." New Jersey Libraries 27 (Spring 1994): 11-14.

    Aitchison, J. and Gilchrist, A. Thesaurus Construction: A Practical Manual. London: ASLIB, 1987. A general guide to the intellectual task of developing a thesaurus. Anderson, Eric S. "A warm fuzzy muffin: or wired rural libraries. Ohio Libraries 8 (Spring/Summer 1995): 6-8. Thoughts on planning, libraries, and the future. Boss, Richard. The Library Manager's Guide to Automation. 2nd edition. White Plains, NY: Knowledge Industry Publications, Inc., 1984. Introduction to computer technology for managers. Includes discussion of planning considerations for acquiring and implementing an automated system. Butler, Brett, and Aveney, Brian, and Scholz, William. "Conversion of Manual Catalogs to Collection Databases." Library Technology Reports 14 (March/April 1978) 109-201. Comprehensive coverage of procedures for doing bibliographic data conversion. Carter, Ruth C. and Bruntjen, Scott. Data Conversion. White Plains, NY: Knowledge Industry Press, 1983. Planning and implementation of a data conversion project. Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of various methods of conversion. Clayton, Marlene. Managing Library Automation. London: Gower Publishing Company, 1987. Concise, readable guide to the main factors which librarians should be aware of when considering computerization. General principles behind library automation, terminology and standard techniques used in the field are emphasized. Includes advice on introducing systems from the earliest planning stages, through the entire procurement exercise, implementation and the final monitoring of the working system. Corbin, John. Implementing the Automated Library System. Phoenix: Oryx Press, 1988. "A practical handbook and guide for integrating automation into existing library functions." Describes the steps of the implementation project, including organizational and management structure, tasks and procedures, job design and staffing, space planning and design, documentation, database conversion, computer operations, and automated function, activation and evaluation. Managing the Library Automation Project. Phoenix: Oryx Press, 1985. "A practical handbook and guide for the librarian untrained in systems development." Emphasizes the planning, organization management and step-by-step process of a library automation project. Introduces computer technology; discusses project organization, staffing, management and planning; analyzes system procurement, installation and operation; includes site preparation, database conversion, staff and user education and training, and system installation acceptance and operation. Crawford, Walt. Bibliographic Displays in the Online Catalog. White Plains, NY: Knowledge Industry Press, 1986. Patron Access: Issues for Online Catalogs. Boston: G.K. Hall & Co., 1987. Presents an exhaustive survey of dozens of aspects of online catalogs, including patron use; terminals, printers, and other peripherals; command methodology; displays; authority and heading files; indexes; processes (such as placing holds) and protection. Dennis, Deborah Ellis. "Who's in charge of automation? The new systems librarian position." New Jersey Libraries 27 (Spring 1994): 6-7. Description of the skills needed and typical tasks performed by the library's staff automation specialist. Epstein, Susan Baerg. "Implementation of an Automated System," Library Journal 108 (September 15, 1983): 1771-72. "Retrospective Conversion Revisited," Library Journal (in 3 parts) (May 1, 1990; June 1, 1990; July 1, 1990): "System Implementation Questions," Library Journal (February 1, 1990) 60-62 Epstein is a consultant specializing in library automation and management. Having observed that much of the literature deals with the selection and procurement of systems, Epstein primarily emphasizes the implementation and evaluation phases of the automation project. She encourages comprehensive planning, realistic schedules and describes typical stages in the implementation process. Epstein's "Libraries & Systems" is a regular feature in LJ and offers practical suggestions for automation librarians. Genaway, David C. Integrated Online Library Systems: Principles, Planning and Implementation. White Plains, NY: Knowledge Industry Publications, Inc., 1984. General discussion of many aspects of library automation, based on Genaway's own experiences selecting and implementing an integrated system at Youngstown State University. Head, John W. and McCabe, Gerard B., editors. Insider's Guide to Library Automation: Essays of Practical Experience. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1993. Essays from librarians in a variety of settings, corporate, academic and public. Provides resources for "librarians involved in automation and for library science students trying to learn about what really goes on in automation...by and for practitioners -- and future practitioners." Emphasizes careful planning, communication, and staff involvement. Hoffman, Ellen. "Managing Automation: A Process, Not a Project," Library Hi Tech. 6:1 (1988) 45-54. When library systems are managed as a continuing process rather than as discrete projects, they are managed by the same people who guide other library activities and not by specialists. The ongoing management of automation should reflect the style and philosophy of the library. The management issues associated with hardware, software, databases, staff and the institutional environment are discussed. Lancaster, F. W. Vocabulary Control for Information Retrieval. 2nd ed. Arlington, VA: Information Resources Press, 1986. Examines the basic elements of using controlled vocabulary in online retrieval systems. Good introduction to thesaurus concepts. Matthews, Joseph R. Public Access to Online Catalogs: A Planning Guide for Managers. Weston, CT: Online, Inc., 1982. A basic primer on public access online catalogs. Part One deals with design choices, searching, effects on users, planning and implementation and the future of Online Public Access Catalogs. Part Two outlines 34 operational online catalogs. "Processing OCLC Tapes," Library Systems Newsletter. vol. VIII, no. 6 (June 1988) 41-45. Pastine, Maureen D. and Kacena, Carolyn. "Library automation, networking, and other online and new technology costs in academic libraries." Library Trends 42 (Winter 1994): 524-536. "Using the costs for the library automation activities at Southern Methodist University plus a review of the literature in automation costs and requirements the authors present some of the hidden as well as obvious budgetary requirements to meet the electronic library needs in small-and medium-sized university libraries today." Reynolds, Dennis. Library Automation: Issues and Applications. New York: R.R. Bowker Co., 1985. Introductory text which discusses the various aspects of library automation. In-depth review of the progress of various library applications. Includes sections outlining the phases in an automation project. Good coverage on contracts and training. Rice, James. Introduction to Library Automation. Littleton, CO: Libraries Unlimited, 1984. Introductory text which provides a very readable overview of automation topics: computer technology, library applications development, systems analysis, evaluation, contracting and implementation. Includes a sample implementation schedule. Saffady, William. Introduction to automation for librarians. Chicago: American Library Association, 3rd edition, 1994. Revised edition of excellent overview of automation topics. Warwick, Robert T. "Moving to a new automated system: some issues." New Jersey Libraries 27 (Spring 1994): 11-14. Reviews planning issues involved in migrating from one automation to another, including database conversion, software testing, and staff training.

 

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